The APTA Clinical Instructor Education and Credentialing Program: A Survey of Clinical Instructors Before and 1 Year After

Purpose/Hypothesis : The role of the Clinical Instructor (CI) is critical in the education of a student physical therapist. The APTA initiated a training program, the Clinical Instructor Education and Credentialing Program (CIECP), which addresses the knowledge and skills required to be an effective CI. It is unclear if CIs change their behaviors and use the knowledge and skills learned in the CIECP while supervising students. The purpose of this study is to determine if CIs report a change in behaviors while supervising students one year after having taken the CIECP.Number of Subjects : 44Materials/Methods : This study was a pre-post survey design using an instrument developed by researchers at Emory University. A survey was administered at the beginning of the CIECP and a second mailed 1 year later. Both surveys were coded so they could be matched without any identifying information. Survey questions were grouped into 6 sections, relevant to the course objectives for each of the sections taught in the CIECP. Six separate repeated measures ANOVAs (RM-ANOVA), corresponding to the 6 sections of the survey, with post-hoc paired t-test comparisons and Bonferroni adjustments were performed to determine whether CI behaviors changed after taking the course. Significance was set at the p<0.05 level.Results : Four courses were taught between March 2009 and June 2011. 132 CIs completed a survey before the CIECP. A total of 44 CIs returned a completed second survey 1 year following the courses for a return rate of 32%. The CIs had a mean age of 35 (+/-7.0), had been a clinician for a mean of 9.2 years (+/- 5.7) and a CI for 5.5 years (+/- 5.2). They had supervised a mean of 2 students since taking the CIECP with a range from 1 to 5 students. RM-ANOVAs revealed a significant within-subjects effect (p<0.05) for CI behaviors on each section of the survey. Post-hoc paired t-test comparisons revealed that 36 of the 58 CI behaviors addressed were significantly changed after taking the course. Significance was found with 9/14 behaviors in Section 1 (Clinician as a Clinical Educator), 7/9 behaviors in Section 2 (Readiness to Learn), 6/6 behaviors in Section 3 (Facilitating Learning in the Clinical Environment), 8/13 behaviors in Section 4 (Performance Assessment), 2/6 behaviors in Section 5 (Legal, Regulatory, and ADA Issues) and 4/10 behaviors in Section 6 (The Exceptional Student).Conclusions : CIs reported changing many of their behaviors while supervising students after taking the CIECP in each of the 6 sections taught in the course. Limitations include sample size, self-report and lack of a control group which precludes one from concluding that enrolling in the CI training course caused the self-reported changes in CI behaviors. CIs who completed the CIECP did self-report a change in behaviors while supervising students one year after having taken the program.Clinical Relevance : Based on this preliminary analysis, clinicians should consider taking the CIECP to enhance their skills and knowledge in their professional development as a CI.

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  • Control #: 1725726
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Martha M. Schiller
  • Keywords: Clinical Instructor Behaviors

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