Clinical Instructor Behaviors and the Effect of Clinical Instructor Credentialing

Purpose/Hypothesis : The role of the Clinical Instructor (CI) is critical in physical therapy (PT) education. The APTA offers a training program, the Clinical Instructor Education and Credentialing Program (CIECP), which addresses the knowledge and skills required to be an effective CI. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency of behaviors that CIs use when supervising PT students and to determine if there is a difference in behaviors based on the APTA Credential.Number of Subjects : 81Materials/Methods : CIs, who had supervised a full-time PT student for a 4, 6, or 14 week clinical experience during 2009/2010, were asked to rate how frequently they performed 55 behaviors on a scale from 1 (never) to 6 (always) on a modified survey that was previously developed by researchers at Emory University. The behaviors were grouped into 6 content areas based on the organization of the CIECP curriculum. A link to the survey was sent via email to the CIs using Survey Monkey. A summative mean score was computed for each of the six sections. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and independent t-tests (p<0.05) to examine differences between APTA credentialed and non-credentialed CIs when survey questions were grouped into the 6 sections and on two questions selected a priori (writing objectives and using a weekly planning form).Results : The survey link was sent to 253 CIs. 81 CIs completed the survey for a return rate of 32%. 53 of the CIs were credentialed. Credentialed CIs had mean ratings of 5 or above for 48 of the 55 behaviors. CIs who were not credentialed had ratings of 5 or above for 42 of the 55 items. Significant differences were found on the 2 a priori behaviors writing behavioral objectives that describe studentÕs expectations and using a weekly planning form. When the behaviors were grouped into sections, significant differences were found with behaviors pertaining to Sections 1, 4 and 6: The Clinician as a Clinical Educator, Performance Assessment and Managing the Exceptional Student. No significant differences were found with questions relating to Sections 2, 3 or 5: Readiness to Learn, Facilitating Learning in the Clinical Environment or Legal, Regulatory and ADA Issues.Conclusions : All of the CIs in this study frequently used many of the behaviors taught in the CIECP. Credentialed CIs write behavioral objectives and use a weekly planning form as well as reporting behaviors related to their role as a CI, performance assessment and managing exceptional students more frequently than non-credentialed CIs.Clinical Relevance : The CIECP enhances CIs knowledge and skills relevant to clinical education in a number of content areas and may be a valuable tool in the professional development of CIs. Based on this preliminary analysis, CIs should consider taking the CIECP to enhance their role as a clinical educator.

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  • Control #: 1725836
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Martha M. Schiller, Susan A. Talley
  • Keywords: Clinical Instructor Behaviors|CI Credentialing

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