Comparison of Performing and Teaching a Motor Task Using Live Expert Feedback Versus Videotaped Feedback

Purpose/Hypothesis : The first purpose of this study is to determine if teaching a motor task using a live demonstration with expert feedback is more effective than teaching a motor task through videotape demonstration and feedback via watching the videotape continuously. The second purpose of the study is to determine if there is a correlation between scores on performing a motor task and teaching a motor task.Number of Subjects : A total of 37 subjects were recruited from Touro College School of Health Sciences. 16 subjects were in the live demonstration group and 21 subjects were in the videotape demonstration group. After being randomly divided into student therapist and patient, there was a total of 9 subjects who were scored on demonstrating and teaching the motor task. Of these, 4 were in the live demonstration group and 5 were in the videotape group.Materials/Methods : All subjects had no prior knowledge of the motor task to be learned. All subjects were taught the scapula proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) pattern of anterior depression/posterior elevation. In part one of the study, subjects who were randomly assigned to the live feedback group were taught the skill by a live expert. This group practiced for 10 minutes during which time they received feedback and had questions answered by the live expert. Subjects in the videotape group viewed a video demonstration of the same task. They practiced the task for 10 minutes. During this time, they were able to repeat the video as often as they chose. For each group, when practice time was finished, each subject was videotaped performing the PNF pattern on a new subject. In part two of the study each of the Òstudent PTÕsÓ was videotaped teaching another subject how to perform the scapula pattern on a third subject. Rubrics were developed and used to score subjects performing and teaching the PNF scapula pattern.Results : Rubric scores were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test, using SPSS. There were no statistically significant differences in either performance or teaching between groups using live expert or videotaped demonstration and feedback. It is of interest to note that the group that received live expert feedback tended to score higher in their ability to teach the motor task compared to the videotape feedback group.Conclusions : Learning a motor skill using demonstration and feedback from a live expert was equally as effective as using videotape demonstration and feedback.Clinical Relevance : Physical therapy students must learn many motor skills during their professional education. It is incumbent upon the schools to seek out the most effective and efficient methods of teaching these skills. Physical therapy students as well as physical therapists must teach patients motor skills in clinical practice. It is very important that the physical therapy profession seek out the most effective way to be excellent teachers.

BACK to Abstract Results

  • Control #: 1726242
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Roslyn Sofer, Danielle Cuozzo, Julianne Kliphus, Alla Naumenko, Rashada Thompson, Dara Zisser
  • Keywords: Motor learning|Live expert feedback|Videotape feedback

BACK to Abstract Results