Early Professionalism and Professional/Social Responsibility Scores on the Clinical Performance Instrument Predict Success on the National Physical Therapy Examination

Purpose/Hypothesis : There is evidence that poor affective domain behaviors negatively impact student academic and clinical performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between first internship Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) scores and first time pass scores on the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE).Number of Subjects : 75Materials/Methods : First clinical internship CPI scores and initial NPTE scores of graduates from a physical therapist education program at a large North Central Region university were retrospectively analyzed. A Pearson product-moment correlation between CPI scores and NPTE scores was completed, followed by multiple linear regression analyses of CPI scores and NPTE scores.Results : A predictive relationship was found between two CPI criteria (Criterion 3-Professionalism; ? = .22, p ? .052; and Criterion 22-Professional/Social Responsibility; ? = .320, p ? .006), and NPTE scores. Together, these criteria yielded R square = .205 for NPTE.Conclusions : Clinical Instructor rating of student characteristics of professionalism and professional/social responsibility criteria of the first internship CPI were predictive of first time pass scores on the NPTE in this population of students.Clinical Relevance : Further studies are needed to determine how attributes related to professionalism and professional/social responsibility contribute to student success on the NPTE and how these attributes can be developed in students. It may also be helpful to identify these attributes in applicants prior to admission to physical therapist education programs.

BACK to Abstract Results

  • Control #: 1727035
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Jeanne L. Cook, Elizabeth M. Williamson, Patricia A. Cahoj, Nancy D. Drake
  • Keywords: Clinical Peformance Instrument|National Physical Therapy Examination|professionalism

BACK to Abstract Results