Considerations for pairing the student learning dyad in a collaborative clinical experience

Purpose: To respond to growing physical therapy (PT) class sizes and the increased demand for clinical education (CE) sites, the collaborative model (more than 1 student to a clinical instructor (CI)) has become increasingly popular. ÊThis model has been shown to be a viable alternative model to the traditional (1:1) model, with students demonstrating enhanced clinical competence, collaboration, communication, delegation and self-confidence all while decreasing the demands on the CI. There has however, been little research into which variables to consider when pairing student learning dyads. Homogenous academic background and grade point average (GPA) may minimize potential differences in student performance, however, academically dissimilar students may benefit from being paired to encourage peer assisted learning (PAL).ÊSubjective variables such as personality traits may have a stronger role to play in the success of this learning model than GPA.Methods/Description: Prior to being matched in a second full time clinical experience, PT studentsÊoffered input about working in a dyad. Students who expressed hesitance were placed in a 1:1 model. Twelve students were placed in a 2:1 model and matched into pairs, and with a clinical facility, by the CE faculty. Consideration was given to subjective traits such as personality, assertiveness and to age, gender and GPA. (One pair self selected due to out of state housing arrangements). CIÕs, who expressed interest in theÊ2:1 model,Êreceived training prior to the start of the experience. Four weeks into the experience, input from CIÕs and students on the impact of the pairing was collected via a survey.Results/Outcomes: Ten students and five CIs completed the survey at the time of this submission. Six students and all CIs disagreed thatÊGPA matters more than personality traits when being paired for a clinical experience. The students cited desire to work in a pair, work ethic, professionalism, learning style and previous professional experience as being more important than GPA for a successful 2:1 experience. The majority of students (eight) felt that differences in the dyad helped make them a stronger team and that the experience helped improve their communication skills as part of a healthcare team. All CIs reported observing PAL, with students alternating the role of tutor. Challenges cited by students included decreased time with their CI and a smaller caseload.Conclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: The collaborative model has evolved out of necessity and creativity to increase CE opportunities but presents unique opportunities when pairing students to foster PAL and enhanceÊcommunication and collaboration.ÊTo achieve the goals of the collaborative CE experience, factors other than GPA need to be taken into account when pairing learning dyads. Despite frequently working cooperatively on didactic curriculum content in the classroom, students may benefit from additional training on working in a student dyad prior to the clinical experience. ÊReferences: 1. Baer J. Grouping and achievement in cooperative learning. College Teaching. 2003; 51 (4): 169-174. 2. Bartges M. Pairing students in clinical assignments to develop collaboration and communication skills. Nurse Educ. 2012; 37 (1): 17-22. 3. DeClute J, Ladyshewsky R. Enhancing clinical competence using a collaborative clinical education model. Phys Ther. 1993; 73 (10): 683-689. 4. Fantuzzo JW, Riggio RE, Connelly S, Dimeff LA. Effects of reciprocal peer tutoring on academic achievement and psychological adjustment: A component analysis. J Educ Psychol. 1989; 81 (2): 173- 5. Ladyshewsky RK. Peer-assisted learning in clinical education: A review of terms and learning principles. J Phys Ther Educ. Fall 2000; 14 (2): 15-22. 6. Ladyshewsky RK, Barrie SC, Drake VM. A comparison of productivity and learning outcome in individual and cooperative physical therapy clinical education models. Phys Ther. 1998; 78 (12): 1288-1298. 7. Nemshick MT, Shepard KF. Physical therapy clinical education in a 2:1 student-instructor education model. PhysTher. 1996; 76 (9): 968-982. 8. Rindflesch AB, Dunfee HJ, Cieslak KR, Eischen SL, Trenary T, Calley DQ, Heinle DK. Collaborative model of clinical education in physical and occupational therapy at the Mayo Clinic. J Allied Health. 2009; 38 (3): 132-142. 9. Ruth-Sahd LA. Student nurse dyads create a community of learning: proposing a holistic clinical education theory. J Adv Nurs. 2011; 2445-2454. Ê

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  • Control #: 1996403
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: Keshrie Naidoo
  • Keywords:

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