Developing Clinical Practice Standards: A Collaboration Between Mayo Clinic in Arizona and Physical Therapy Students at Northern Arizona University

Purpose : To facilitate the use of Evidence Based Practice (EBP) in the busy clinical setting, while providing Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students with an opportunity to critically appraise, analyze, and synthesize program curriculum in the creation of Clinical Practice Standards (CPS).Description : CPS are 5-10 page documents intended to provide the clinician with a summary of current evidence-based practices, treatment goals, and outcome measures tailored to the culture of the unique practice setting. The development of a CPS is time consuming and may be costly to an institution as it may require clinicians to be removed from billable activites leading to a potential loss of revenue. The Phoenix-based Northern Arizona University (NAU) DPT program and Therapy Services department at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona formed a professional collaboration in which groups of DPT students completed a CPS in partial fulfillment of the Medical Therapeutics course requirements. Topics were assigned based on the clinical relevance and needs of the therapy department. CPS topics included acute and chronic stroke, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, early mobilization of the ventilator dependent patient and the patient with a femoral catheter, concussion, cancer related fatigue, and fall risk assessment/discharge planning. The semester-long collaboration resulted in eight evidence-based CPS documents. All documents were further edited by clinician experts at the Mayo Clinic Arizona to ensure they met with departmental and institutional standards. The student-generated documents demonstrated excellent literature reviews and topic development. Planned improvements for future collaboration include narrowing the topic parameters, having students observe a patient who fits the CPS, and having students meet once with a clinician who has expertise in the topic area.Summary of Use : To improve quality of care provided to patients and to decrease waste, many large therapy departments are developing CPSs. However, development of these documents is marginalized by the need to balance staffing and productivity requirements while providing high quality care. Professional collaboration between clinics and academia to develop CPSs with local DPT programs can prove beneficial to all stakeholders. Students learn critical skills for life-long learning and EBP, while receiving additional mentorship from community clinicians, and clinical practices gain valuable, unbiased summaries of current best evidence for immediate implementation into patient care while minimizing the loss of billable patient care time.Importance to Members: The CPS project represents a mutually beneficial collaboration between NAU and the Mayo Clinic that is easily reproducible. The collaboration facilitates exchange of information between academic and clinical settings, benefiting all stakeholders including patients, DPT students, the academic institution, clinicians and therapy administrators.

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  • Control #: 2018971
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Pamela S. Kline, Melissa M. Eden, Pamela R. Bosch, Kim Kulovitz Gatewood
  • Keywords: clinical practice standards|evidence based practice|physical therapy

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