Student Opinions and Outcomes of Hybrid versus Traditional Teaching Methods in Orthopaedic Physical Therapy

Purpose/Hypothesis : Emerging trends in education frequently use technology to assist with delivery of educational materials. The flipped classroom method is currently en vogue as a means to utilize hybrid education yet little information regarding student opinions or outcomes exist in physical therapy. The flipped classroom entails having students watch recorded lectures at home prior to class while utilizing class time for problem solving and practice exercises. The purpose of this project is to describe student opinions and outcomes of the flipped classroom teaching and traditional lecture/lab methods of teaching within orthopaedic physical therapy.Number of Subjects : A cohort of 36 first year students enrolled at a regional physical therapy program were given the opportunity to complete a survey of their impressions of traditional and flipped classroom teaching methods.Materials/Methods : An anonymous internet-based survey was conducted following the completion of the first orthopaedics course (upper quarter). The course consisted of teaching using the flipped classroom for 2 topics (cervical spine and elbow/forearm.) Traditional methods were used to teach shoulder, wrist/hand and TMJ. The survey was created by the teachers to aid in planning for the second course in the orthopaedic series and was composed of 13 closed ended questions asking students preferred teaching method (flipped, traditional, or both equal) for various categories. Categories included self-directed learning, problem-solving, analytical skills, communication, collaboration, interest to learn, and critical thinking. Students were also queried on their perceived preparation for course exams, practical exams, clinical practice and learning clinical profiles as well as time to practice psychomotor skills. Student exams scores, using the same question bank, were compared to the year prior as a quantitative outcome measure.Results : Twenty-eight (28) students (78%) completed the survey. Generally students felt the flipped classroom better prepared them for all categories except interest in learning and preparation for course exams which were similar between flipped classroom and both equally beneficial. Compared to the previous year, test scores for all content areas were similar (± 3%) except cervical spine which was improved (>10%). When asked outright 27/28 students preferred the flipped teaching method.Conclusions : Generally students preferred the flipped classroom teaching method for the categories included on the survey. Some improvement was noted in test scores for the flipped classroom method comparing to the previous year on one exam.Clinical Relevance : Teachers seeking ways to incorporate technology into the classroom may consider utilizing the flipped classroom method. Student opinions indicate the flipped classroom is preferable to traditional methods yet objective outcomes appear similar.

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  • Control #: 2020833
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Craig Wassinger, Duane A. Williams
  • Keywords: Hybrid Teaching Methods|Flipped Classroom|Orthopaedics

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