Approaches for Teaching Psychosocial Education to Physical Therapy Students: A Systematic Review

Purpose/Hypothesis : Psychosocial factors play a significant role in establishing and maintaining the patient-physical therapist alliance and in optimizing rehabilitation outcomes including quality of life and health-related quality of life. As a result, it is important that physical therapy professional education programs utilize effective teaching methods to facilitate knowledge and skill development in the management of psychosocial issues in patient care. The purpose of this review is to identify and describe the methods being used to teach psychosocial education to students in graduate professional health care education programs and the efficacy of these approaches in promoting student learning.Number of Subjects : Four studies were included in this reviewMaterials/Methods : OVID Medline, CINAHL and OVID PsycINFO were searched for relevant articles. Qualitative descriptive studies that investigate psychosocial education in graduate level professional education in PT, OT, medicine, psychology, social work, nursing, and speech and language pathology were considered for inclusion. Initial study selection was performed independently by two review authors (MA and KB). The authors examined titles and abstracts to produce a list of potentially relevant reports which were then retrieved and examined independently by the same review authors in order to obtain a final list of eligible reports. If consensus was not achieved, a third party (RK) adjudicated. All authors performed data extraction, data analysis and assessment of bias and overall study rigor.Results : Self-reflection was a teaching method found in all review articles. Small group continuity, experiential learning, role-modeling, self-assessment, writing exercises, role-play, sharing and listening to a partner, interdisciplinary faculty sessions and standardized patients were found in 2 of 4 studies. The most common course content included death and dying, strategies for effective verbal communication and self-awareness which appeared in 2 of 4 studies. 22 additional topics were found with no commonalities across the 4 studies.Conclusions : This systematic review revealed a lack of uniformity in curricular design, content and approaches to teaching psychosocial education in graduate professional health care education programs. The review articles did not demonstrate overall rigor and failed to limit bias, however they do suggest teaching methods and psychosocial education content that may be applied to establishing curricular standards for teaching psychosocial education in Doctor of Physical Therapy programs and other graduate level health care education programs.Clinical Relevance : The goal of developing psychosocially informed physical therapists is an important step in realizing patient-centered care and practice within the Biopsychosocial model. In order to achieve this goal, an understanding of best practices for teaching psychosocial education is necessary. This review demonstrates that methods to teach this multidimensional topic and delineate specific curricular standards have not been adequately researched.

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  • Control #: 2024234
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Randy Kolodny, Michelle Akazawa, Jordan Seda, Kara Becker
  • Keywords: Psychosocial|Education|Teaching

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