The effectiveness of an interprofessional education experience using documentary film to teach principles of disability in Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Rehab Counseling Curricula

Purpose/Hypothesis : The purpose of this research was to assess the perceived effectiveness and usefulness of educational film as an interventional tool to provide students in an interprofessional education (IPE) experience common ground to discuss disability issues.Number of Subjects : In the spring of 2014, an IPE module on disability awareness was held with students in the departments of Occupational Therapy (29 students), Physical Therapy (34 students), and Rehabilitation Counseling (7 students). Student evaluations were performed at the end of the IPE experienceMaterials/Methods : The IPE module on disability awareness consisted of four, three-hour class periods that included a brief formal presentation, the viewing of a documentary film ("Normal for Us: The Miller Twins", "If I Can't Do It", and "When Billy Broke His Head"), followed by small group discussions, and a large group discussion wrap-up. During the last session, rather than watching a film there was an individual with a disability who came and spoke with the students about her experiences. A focus group interview was held with faculty from different departments and individual interviews were held with students who were in the IPE module. The student evaluation of teaching forms were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the open ended remarks were coded using qualitative research methodology. The interviews were transcribed and qualitative data analysis was performed. Codes were identified through the analysis and themes were identified.Results : From the student evaluation of teaching, there was an overall response rate of 84.29% (OT=75.86%, PT=88.24%, and RC=100%). Of the respondents, 30.51% reported that the overall IPE module experience was either "very good" or "excellent", while 44.07% reported that the experience was "good". Of the different instructional modalities used, 67.8% ranked documentary film as either #1 or #2 favorite mode of instruction, whereas 86.44% ranked an actual person with a disability as a guest speaker as either #1 or #2. The least favorite methods were "formal presentation" and "large group discussion" (74.58% and 77.96% ranked as either 4th or 5th favorite respectively). On average, 71.19% of respondents reported that the films had a "moderate" or "large impact" on their level of disability awareness.Conclusions : Although much was gained through program evaluation of how to improve upon the IPE module on disability for the future, it was found that documentary film did provide a medium by which students from different professions were able to have meaningful discussions and deepened understanding about the disability experience. The themes and lessons learned will be discussed in greater detail in the presentation.Clinical Relevance : As IPE becomes more common in the academic preparation of health professional students, this research may provide a model for providing interdisciplinary learners with a shared experience to aid in stimulating discussion and learning.

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  • Control #: 2025246
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Timothy K. Nelson
  • Keywords: Educational Film|Interprofessional Education

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